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  978-0-9992249-3-9; ISBN (e-book): 978-0-9992249-5-3; Library of Congress control # 2017916590; BISAC codes: 1--SOC022000 Social Science/Popular Culture; 2--HIS03080 History/Modern/21st Century; 3--FAM039000 Family & Relationships/Life Strategy/School Age; 4--EDU034000 Education/Educational Policy & Reform/General; 5--EDU016000 Education/History; 6--BUS085000 Business & Economics/Organizational Behavior

ISBN (hardcover): 978-0-9992249-3-9; ISBN (e-book): 978-0-9992249-5-3; Library of Congress control # 2017916590; BISAC codes: 1--SOC022000 Social Science/Popular Culture; 2--HIS03080 History/Modern/21st Century; 3--FAM039000 Family & Relationships/Life Strategy/School Age; 4--EDU034000 Education/Educational Policy & Reform/General; 5--EDU016000 Education/History; 6--BUS085000 Business & Economics/Organizational Behavior

Learning

An engaging sequel to Relating to Ancient Culture is Wietgrefe’s
thought-provoking Relating to Ancient Learning As it Influences
the 21st Century.

  • Experience cannot be passed on; it must be learned.
  • Like destroyers of ancient libraries, systems can vanish not just by destruction, but also by changed learning systems.
  • Many children have been given everything including free and subsidized education into their twenties. Consequently, their minds have not developed abilities to satisfy basic needs.
  • Some of the world’s most fascinating and innovative problem solvers of the past two centuries were independent thinkers. School was an aid, not a solution.
  • Traditional learning relies on memory. The computer literate do not.
  • World transition to electronic artificial memory may be the biggest setback in human history.
  • The world does not survive on those in school. It survives and changes when people act, work, think, are responsible, and take risks.